Tag Archives: particular sadness of lemon cake

Dying To Read..

14 Jun

These are a few books that I’m so excited to read that I’m practically tying myself to a chair to prevent the inevitable sprinting to Chapters to buy them. I am typically a patient(ish) person – I’ll see a book I want to read, either online, in the paper or in the store, and then I’ll place a hold for pickup at my library. The only problem is that sometimes, other people want to read the same books that I do. Then what happens is I get stuck in an inevitable holds lineup of anywhere from 7 to 44 people. And the line never gets any shorter. It’s so frustrating. And yes, I’m the type of person to check my library holds online 4 times a day. Guess what people! READ FASTER! But, since I’m poor and cheap, I must sit patient(ish)ly and await my turn to read said books. Sigh. Such is the life of a reader, I suppose.

Anywho, here they are: the ‘I-Can’t-Wait-To-Reads’!

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake

By: Aimee Bender

First, read the reviews from The Globe and Mail and The Millions.

Photo thanks to opl.on.ca

And here’s the book description from Amazon.ca:

On the eve of her ninth birthday, unassuming Rose Edelstein, a girl at the periphery of schoolyard games and her distracted parents’ attention, bites into her mother’s homemade lemon-chocolate cake and discovers she has a magical gift: she can taste her mother’s emotions in the cake. She discovers this gift to her horror, for her mother—her cheerful, good-with-crafts, can-do mother—tastes of despair and desperation. Suddenly, and for the rest of her life, food becomes a peril and a threat to Rose.

The curse her gift has bestowed is the secret knowledge all families keep hidden—her mother’s life outside the home, her father’s detachment, her brother’s clash with the world. Yet as Rose grows up she learns to harness her gift and becomes aware that there are secrets even her taste buds cannot discern.

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake is a luminous tale about the enormous difficulty of loving someone fully when you know too much about them. It is heartbreaking and funny, wise and sad, and confirms Aimee Bender’s place as “a writer who makes you grateful for the very existence of language.

The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie

By: Alan Bradley

This one has been recommended to me by several of my old colleagues at the bookstore, who say that it is absolutely adorable, but also a very compelling mystery story.

Photo thanks to opl.on.ca

Here’s an article about the author himself – a 70 year old from Cobourg, ON initially! Props to Canada.

And here’s the description from Amazon.ca:

A delightfully dark English mystery, featuring precocious young sleuth Flavia de Luce and her eccentric family.

The summer of 1950 hasn’t offered up anything out of the ordinary for eleven-year-old Flavia de Luce: bicycle explorations around the village, keeping tabs on her neighbours, relentless battles with her older sisters, Ophelia and Daphne, and brewing up poisonous concoctions while plotting revenge in their home’s abandoned Victorian chemistry lab, which Flavia has claimed for her own.

But then a series of mysterious events gets Flavia’s attention: A dead bird is found on the doormat, a postage stamp bizarrely pinned to its beak. A mysterious late-night visitor argues with her aloof father, Colonel de Luce, behind closed doors. And in the early morning Flavia finds a red-headed stranger lying in the cucumber patch and watches him take his dying breath. For Flavia, the summer begins in earnest when murder comes to Buckshaw: “I wish I could say I was afraid, but I wasn’t. Quite the contrary. This was by far the most interesting thing that had ever happened to me in my entire life.”

Did the stranger die of poisoning? There was a piece missing from Mrs. Mullet’s custard pie, and none of the de Luces would have dared to eat the awful thing. Or could he have been killed by the family’s loyal handyman, Dogger… or by the Colonel himself! At that moment, Flavia commits herself to solving the crime — even if it means keeping information from the village police, in order to protect her family. But then her father confesses to the crime, for the same reason, and it’s up to Flavia to free him of suspicion. Only she has the ingenuity to follow the clues that reveal the victim’s identity, and a conspiracy that reaches back into the de Luces’ murky past.

A thoroughly entertaining romp of a novel, The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is inventive and quick-witted, with tongue-in-cheek humour that transcends the macabre seriousness of its subject.

Summer at Tiffany

By: Marjorie Hart

The wonderfully glamourous-sounding memoir of one woman’s move to New York City to be a clerk at Tiffany’s for a summer. How luxurious! Well, maybe it wasn’t exactly a breeze, but that’s exactly why I want to read it..all the gritty details of the world’s most glam store.

Photo thanks to amazon.ca

And here is the description from Amazon.ca:

New York City, 1945. Marjorie Jacobson and her best friend, Marty Garrett, arrive fresh from the Kappa house at the University of Iowa hoping to find summer positions as shopgirls. Turned away from the top department stores, they miraculously find jobs as pages at Tiffany & Co., becoming the first women to ever work on the sales floor, a diamond-filled day job replete with Tiffany-blue shirtwaist dresses from Bonwit Teller’s—and the envy of all their friends.

Looking back on that magical time in her life, Marjorie takes us back to when she and Marty rubbed elbows with the rich and famous, pinched pennies to eat at the Automat, experienced nightlife at La Martinique, and danced away their weekends with dashing midshipmen. Between being dazzled by Judy Garland’s honeymoon visit to Tiffany, celebrating VJ Day in Times Square, and mingling with CafÉ society, she fell in love, learned unforgettable lessons, made important decisions that would change her future, and created the remarkable memories she now shares with all of us.

Runners Up

Photo thanks to opl.on.ca

Photo thanks to opl.on.ca

Okay, fine, I’ll wait..

..but you know I’ll be watching my holds very closely. Or, I could break the bank and scamper on down to the local bookstore. Huh. We’ll see!

Let me know: what books are you dying to read??

xoxo, S.

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